Discussion Response

DISCUSSION RESPONSE 1

DiscussionResponse

UniversityAffiliation

Stefanie Polanco

I agree with theassertion that building therapeutic relationships is the mostimportant factor in ensuring treatment outcomes. In this regard, itis critical for an occupational therapist to enhance collaborationwith the patient (Taylor, Lee, &amp Kielhofner, 2011). Besides,proper use of the international relationship model contributes tooccupational engagement. I also concur with the decision to cultivateempathy for the client’s condition. Consequently, the patient canlearn to overcome negative thoughts and speech. Furthermore,revealing personal details to the client would cultivate trustbetween the client and the occupational therapist (Taylor, Lee, &ampKielhofner, 2011). Many clients feel that other people cannotunderstand their situation. Therefore, it is essential to offerfrequent words of comfort. For example, positive outcomes wererealized in Mr. Kelley’s case since the therapist took personalinterest. Involving a client in setting goals also helps to buildconfidence in and commitment to therapy.

Primrose

Indeed, patientsdiagnosed with chronic disabling conditions pass through three stagesbefore accepting their limitations (Cara &amp MacRae, 2013). Thefirst stage requires the client to understand the impairment.Subsequently, the patient should adjust her schedule andresponsibilities to avoid weakening her body. In this respect, theclient must hold discussions with family members and employers todetermine the level of work that would be manageable with hercondition. Eventually, an occupational therapist would strive to helpthe client accept their condition (Cara &amp MacRae, 2013). Forexample, patients that adapt to physical disabilities require thesupport of an OT practitioner. I also agree that evaluation toolssuch as the Mini Mental Status could be used to discover the extentof Mr. Kelley’s limitations before embarking on interventions.

References

Cara, E., &amp MacRae, A. (2013). Psychosocial occupationaltherapy: An evolving practice. Nelson Education.

Taylor, R. R., Lee, S. W., &amp Kielhofner, G. (2011).Practitioners` use of interpersonal modes within the therapeuticrelationship: Results from a nationwide study. OTJR, 31(1),6-14. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/15394492-201005210

Discussion Response

DISCUSSION RESPONSE 1

DiscussionResponse

UniversityAffiliation

Anisley

Indeed,implementing co-occupation will enable an occupational therapist toestablish a relationship-centered approach when dealing with patientssuffering from dementia. In this regard, family visits should be usedto educate the patient’s loved ones on the significance of havinggroup meals and leisure activities. Engaging in functional activitiestogether contributes to patient care by boosting the relationshipbetween the client and the caregiver (Ciara &amp Holloway, 2013).Furthermore, children that experience sexual abuse requireoccupational therapists to adopt holistic intervention methods.Education, sleep patterns, social participation, and regular rest areall hampered after the occurrence of sexual assault. Consequently,the recovering child can learn to heal and acquire new skills. It isalso important for OT practitioners to utilize their extensivetraining and expertise to ensure that such children can resume theirparticipation in social activities (Petrenchik &amp Weis, 2015).

Yumel

I agree with the assertion that caregivers need to receive adequatetraining to boost a child’s development. Co-occupation providescaregivers with the opportunity to involve parents in the child’scare. Consequently, the occupational therapist can establish afunctional relationship with the child. The patient will also deriveconfidence to initiate interactions with other people and hencebenefit from sensory modulation (Whitcomb, Carrasco, Neuman, &ampKloos, 2015). Besides, children play groups need to be combined withoccupational therapy methods to encourage emotional regulation andsocial interaction (Lambert, 2013). Setting up play sessions canprovide children with the opportunity to interact freely with theirpeers. Occupational therapists can also use cognitive approaches whendealing with teenagers prone to self-mutilation. It is essential tounderstand the triggers that lead to self-destructive behavior.Consequently, the family can be contacted to provide valuablecontributions.

References

Cara, E., &amp Holloway, E. (2013Mental health of infants:attachment through the lifespan. In Cara, E., &amp MacRae, A. (Eds).Psychosocial occupational therapy: An evolving practice (3rded., pp. 343-383). Delmar, NY: Cengage Learning.

Lambert, W., L. (2013). Mental health of children. In Psychosocialoccupational therapy: An evolving practice (3rd ed.,pp.384-426). Clifton Park, NY: Thomson Delmar Learning.

Petrenchik, T, &amp Weis, D. (2015). Childhood trauma. TheAmerican Occupational Therapy Association.

Whitcomb, D. A., Carrasco, R. C., Neuman, A., &amp Kloos, H. (2015).Correlational research to examine the relation between attachment andsensory modulation in young children. American Journal ofOccupational Therapy, 69,6904220020. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.015503