Diagnosing and Managing Cardiovascular and Neurologic Conditions-Case Study 3

Diagnosingand Managing Cardiovascular and Neurologic Conditions-Case Study 3

Diagnosingand Managing Cardiovascular and Neurologic Conditions-Case Study 3

DifferentialDiagnosis in the Case Study is Selected.

Migraines:Patients with migraines are sensitive to light and in otherinstances, they experience nausea and vomiting. Further, migrainesare accompanied by pain that is throbbing and occurs periodically. Itcould explain the lasting of the pain for 12-18 hours.

Chronicmigraines: Patients face throbbing pain that affects one side of thehead. It could be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Patients aresensitive to sound and light (Da Silva &amp Tepper, 2012).

Tension-typeheadache: Pain is faced at both sides of the head. Patients alsoexperience a steady ache on the head (Kaniecki, 2012).

Likely Diagnosis for the Patient

The most likely diagnosis is a medication-overuse headache.Medications are linked to the persistent pain the patient issuffering. Drugs that have been associated with the same includepainkillers such as ibuprofen, sedatives, and migraine medications(Tepper, 2012). The patient has been using ibuprofen andacetaminophen for pain relief. The use of such drugs can beattributed to the progress of the condition the female patient isfacing. Further, considering that the patient continuously uses thedrugs at any given instance she is feeling the pain, chances arethere could be an overdose of the medications. The excessive use ofsuch drugs can be attributed to the development of amedication-overuse headache (Russell &amp Lundqvist, 2012).

Treatment and Management plan for the Patient

The most appropriate way of dealing with the condition is stop theintake of the drugs. Depending on the drugs she is using, she caneither be hospitalized to facilitate detoxification or she cangradually avoid them. Tepper (2012) states that antihistamines shouldbe provided to patients but only under the watch of a medicalpractitioner.

Strategies for Educating Patients on the Disorder

The patient can be informed of the need to ensure that she consultsthe physician before resorting to the use of any drug. An awarenessprogram can be initiated that educates her on the proper use ofmedication. She can be educated on available sources that educatewomen on various medical conditions (National Institutes of Health,2012). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (2012b)acknowledges that patients should seek screening, to identify thedisease in time for timely interventions. Further the patient can beeducated on how to read and understand the labeling instructions ofthe medication they are taking. Tepper (2012) posits that patientsshould be educated on need to avoid caffeine-containing substances.

References

Centers forDisease Control and Prevention. (2012b). Women’s health. Retrievedfrom

http://www.cdc.gov/women/

Da Silva, A. N., &amp Tepper, S. J. (2012). Acute treatment ofmigraines. CNS Drugs, 26(10), 823–839.http://doi.org/10.2165/11635440-000000000-00000

Kaniecki, R. G. (2012). Tension-type headache. Continuum(Minneapolis, Minn.), 18(4), 823–34.http://doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000418645.32032.32

Russell, M. B., &amp Lundqvist, C. (2012). Prevention and managementof medication overuse headache. Current Opinion in Neurology,25(3), 290–295. http://doi.org/10.1097/WCO.0b013e328352c431

Da Silva, A. N., &amp Tepper, S. J. (2012). Acute treatment ofmigraines. CNS Drugs, 26(10), 823–839.http://doi.org/10.2165/11635440-000000000-00000

Kaniecki, R. G. (2012). Tension-type headache. Continuum(Minneapolis, Minn.), 18(4), 823–34.http://doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000418645.32032.32

NationalInstitutes of Health. (2012). Office of Research on Women’s Health(ORWH).

Retrieved fromhttp://orwh.od.nih.gov/

Russell, M. B., &amp Lundqvist, C. (2012). Prevention and managementof medication overuse headache. Current Opinion in Neurology,25(3), 290–295. http://doi.org/10.1097/WCO.0b013e328352c431

Tepper, S. J.(2012). Medication-overuse headache. CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learningin

Neurology,18(4, Headache), 807-822.