Cross- Sectional Anatomy

CROSS-SECTIONAL ANATOMY

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Cross-Sectional Anatomy

TheChallenges in Ultrasound Imaging of the Pancreas and AssociatedDigestive Tract

Theprocess of examining the pancreas and associated digestive tract isoften affected by the presence of bowel gas. A recommendation forpatients before an ultrasound is to implement a fast. The patientshould not drink or eat before the procedure. The stipulated timelinecan range from 8- 12 hours. Avoiding consumption ensures that thepancreas and digestive tract are visible. A fundamental challengethat emerges when a patient has not followed this requirementeffectively is that the presence of bowel gas blocks the waves ofthe ultrasound, therefore, limiting actual imaging by the sonographer(Lubin, et al. 2013)

Inorder to solve this problem, it is imperative to inform the patientto adhere to the fasting requirements as stipulated. In addition,there is a need to provide a clear explanation concerning theimplications of gastric gas to process.

Anotherhandle that can emerge in ultrasound imaging is the challenge ofattaining a quality diagnostic ultrasound on the organs. Thedigestive tract and the pancreas are situated in low positions of thestomach, therefore, making it difficult for the sonographer to have aclear resolution. A case in point is the pancreas which is 6 incheslong and sits below the stomach. The position of the organ presentsdifficulty in getting detailed images which can cause strain to thesonographer (Barry, 2011).

A practical approach to resolving this challenge is to reduce theprobe frequency. The approach will ensure successful penetration tothe tissues. In the event that the method of reducing the frequencydoes not work, then it is vital to use state-of – the- arttechnologies that are expensive. It is, however, essential to firsttalk to the patient on the matter before proceeding (Barry, 2011).

References

Barry,D. (2011). The Challenge for Ultrasound Imaging. ImagingTechnology News.

Lubin,M, Dodson, T, Winawer, H. (2013). MedicalManagement of the Surgical Patient.

CambridgeUniversity Press.